2024 Clan Gathering – tickets now available!

The 2024 Gathering of the Clan Hannay Society will take place on 24-26th May!

The timetable for the Gathering is:

Friday 24th May

19:00 – 21.00 hrs. Reception at Sorbie Tower. £15 per head including wine (or soft drink) and nibbles. A chance to see the Tower by candlelight with the fires lit. Clan members and their guests welcome.

Saturday 25th May

10.30 hrs for 11.00 hrs. AGM. Garlieston Village Hall. Clan members and their guests welcome. Free of charge, no ticket required.

13.00 hrs. Light buffet lunch following AGM. £17 per head. Clan members and their guests welcome.

15.00 hrs. Clan Gathering and Piping in the Colours at Sorbie Tower. Free of charge, no ticket required, all welcome.

18.30 hrs for 19.00 hrs prompt. Clan Dinner Dance at the Creebridge House Hotel, Newton Stewart. Tickets £32 per adult, £16 per child up to 12 years. Please note that under 12s will receive a child’s portion dinner. Dress code: feel free to dress up if you wish, or smart casual if you don’t. Clan members and their guests welcome. Space is limited for the Dinner Dance. Please make your reservation as soon as possible to avoid disappointment.

If you have any special dietary requirements or food allergies, please contact the Membership Secretary.

Sunday 26th May

12.00 hrs onwards. Picnic with Clan games at Sorbie Tower. Bring your own picnic and watch or take part in the Clan games (donations welcome), which are open to all, adults and children. Free of charge, no ticket required, all welcome.

Note that you must be logged in as a member to have access to the tickets page.
Click here for tickets.  Click here if you need to log in.  Not a member? Click here to find out more about membership

Captain James Hanna(y), Explorer and Trader of the Canadian Northwestern Coast, d. 1787

2023 Clan Gathering – tickets now available!

The 2023 Gathering of the Clan Hannay Society will take place on 26-28th May and will be followed immediately by a special Scotch-Irish / Ulster Scots Historical and Cultural Trip to Kilkeel, Co. Down, N. Ireland from the 29-30th May for those of you interested in understanding your north Irish clan ancestors. As part of the tour an Ulster Scots Clan Hannay Dinner and Irish Clan Hannay Town Hall Meeting will be held in Kilkeel on the 29th May. Each event can be booked separately.

 

2023 Clan Gathering

A full program of events is planned, to include a reception in Sorbie Tower, the AGM of the Clan Hannay Society, a Dinner Dance and Clan games. Tickets are now available (please log in to view) and a full timetable of events can be seen further down this post.

The 2023 Gathering includes a repeat of the hugely successful reception at Sorbie Tower, which is a rare chance for members and their guests to see the tower by candlelight and with fires lit. The traditional elements of Piping in the Colours at Sorbie Tower, led by Clan Piper, David Hanna, a Dinner Dance on Saturday evening, along with a picnic and Clan games on Sunday also feature over the weekend. 

The Creebridge House Hotel in Newton Stewart is the venue for the Saturday night Dinner Dance, which will feature a traditional ceilidh along with a raffle and auction to raise money for the Tower Restoration Fund (donation of prizes very welcome, bring them along or contact the Clan Convenor).

On Sunday the grounds of Sorbie Tower will be the venue for a family picnic with Clan games. Bring your own food, drink and picnic rug, and simply enjoy the afternoon with other Clan members, or take part in the Clan games. There will be informal games such as badminton, horseshoes etc for all, and plenty of opportunity for children to burn off some excess energy! If you would like to donate a game, or funds to buy a game, to be kept at the Tower, then please contact the Clan Convenor.

The timetable for the Gathering is:

Friday 26th May

19:00 hrs. Reception at Sorbie Tower. Tickets £15 per person including wine (or soft drink) and nibbles. A chance to see the Tower by candlelight. Clan members and their guests welcome.

Saturday 27th May

10.30 hrs for 11.00 hrs. AGM. Garlieston Village Hall. Clan members and their guests welcome. Free of charge, no ticket required.

13.00 hrs. Buffet lunch following AGM. Tickets £15 per person. Clan members and their guests welcome.

15.00 hrs. Piping in the Colours at Sorbie Tower. Free of charge, no ticket required, all welcome.

18.30 hrs for 19.00 hrs prompt. Clan Dinner Dance at the Creebridge House Hotel, Newton Stewart. Tickets £30 per adult, £15 per child up to 12 years. Please note that under 12s will receive a child’s portion dinner. Clan members and their guests welcome.

Sunday 28th May

12.00 hrs onwards. Picnic with Clan games at Sorbie Tower. Bring your own picnic and watch or take part in the Clan games, which are open to all, adults and children. Free of charge, no ticket required, all welcome.

Accommodation

The Creebridge House Hotel is offering a special Bed and Breakfast rate for Clan members of £60 per night for a single room, and £80 per night for a double or twin room, if booked directly with the hotel before May 1st.

For information on accommodation, transport, places to eat and visitor attractions, go to the Visit Scotland website.

Some camping will be available on site. Contact Stephen Hanna to arrange this as space will be limited.

World Scout Jamboree 2023 – Mark Hannay

Mark Hannay to attend World Scout Jamboree

When you hear the word “jamboree,” it’s not unlikely you think of the Scout Movement (or the Boy Scout Association). The word has become strongly associated with the impressive gathering of originally thousands, and now tens of thousands of scouts, held somewhere in the world every four years since 1920 (with only two exceptions based on disruptive world events). Host countries have included Sweden, Japan, the US, UK, Austria, Hungary, Thailand and Chile, among many others.

Our clan will be well represented at the event next year. Sixteen-year-old Mark Hannay, grandson of our Membership Secretary, Jacquie Hannay, and her husband Harry, has been selected to attend the 25th World Scout Jamboree at Saemangeum, South Korea. He is one of only 11 scouts selected from the Cheshire district in England, and he declares he feels honoured to have been given this opportunity.

At the event, he explains, “scouts camp in the host country and meet people from all kinds of places. This year over 40,000 scouts will attend. The jamboree allows young people such as myself an opportunity to travel to new places and experience cultures we have not experienced before.”

He also points out that the event allows young people to share ideas about important issues. “There will be a large focus on the environment this year, and we hope to bring new ideas for sustainability back to our various scout groups around the world.”

Mark and the other members of his district have been working hard to raise money to attend the event, an opportunity with a price tag of nearly £50,000. It is, of course, very expensive to send a large number of scouts to South Korea from around the world—and some of the amount Mark raises will also be used to allow scouts from lower-income countries to attend.

We all wish Mark a rewarding and enjoyable experience, but we can also support him more directly, by donating to the effort and helping to sponsor Mark, his district and others who do not have the means to pay. if you would like to help support this exciting effort, please visit http://wsjchester.org.uk and see the information in the “Donate” section. Please be sure to mention Hannay in the reference of any donations, so we know it’s from you!

 

Andrew Boyd Hannah (1864-1940) Scottish Footballer

 

Andrew Boyd Hannah was an early professional Scottish international footballer in the 19th century who played as a right back in both Scotland and England. Uniquely, he is the only player to have been captain of both Everton FC and Liverpool FC over his three separate spells in English football. He missed just two games in Everton’s 1890–91 English First Division title winning season.

He was born in Renton, Dumbartonshire, north west of Glasgow to Northern Irish emigrant parents from near Killinchy, County Down, Henry Hannah and Margaret Boyd. Henry worked in the Glasgow shipyards and eventually had his own dairy business to which Andrew was apprenticed. However, his penchant for the newly professional association football meant that he was signed for Renton FC.

He won the Scottish Cup twice with Renton and his team was even unofficial world champions after defeating English cup holders, West Bromwich Albion, in 1888. He was subsequently signed by WBA after they saw how good he was. By all accounts, he was an all-round athlete who also competed and won the ‘hop, step and leap’ in the Highland Games at Braemar.

Bizarrely, we also won a £10 wager by going into a Circus lions cage as a publicity stunt! He was married twice and had several daughters and a son. Some of his children emigrated to Canada. A few years ago his unmarked grave in Clydebank cemetery in Glasgow had a gravestone erected by representatives of Everton FC to which some of his descendants attended for its unveiling.

Shannon Bews from Canada is a Clan Member and his great, great, great granddaughter.

2022 Clan Gathering – tickets now available!

The 2022 Gathering of the Clan Hannay Society will take place on 27-29th May.

A full program of events is planned, to include a reception in Sorbie Tower, the AGM of the Clan Hannay Society, a Dinner Dance and Clan games. Tickets are now available (please log in to view) and a full timetable of events can be seen further down this post.

The 2022 Gathering includes the traditional elements of Piping in the Colours at Sorbie Tower, led by Clan Piper, David Hanna, a Dinner Dance on Saturday evening, along with a picnic and Clan games on Sunday.

New for 2022 is a chance for Clan members to see Sorbie Tower by candlelight and with fires lit, between 7pm and 9pm. Prebooking is essential.

The Creebridge House Hotel in Newton Stewart is the venue for the Saturday night Dinner Dance, which will feature a traditional ceilidh along with a raffle and auction to raise money for the Tower Restoration Fund (donation of prizes very welcome, bring them along or contact the Clan Convenor).

On Sunday the grounds of Sorbie Tower will be the venue for a family picnic with Clan games. Bring your own food, drink and picnic rug, and simply enjoy the afternoon with other Clan members, or take part in the Clan games. There will be informal games such as badminton, horseshoes etc for all, and plenty of opportunity for children to burn off some excess energy! If you would like to donate a game, or funds to buy a game, to be kept at the Tower, then please contact the Clan Convenor.

The timetable for the Gathering is:

Friday 27th May

19:00 hrs. Reception at Sorbie Tower. Tickets £15 per person including wine (or soft drink) and nibbles. A chance to see the Tower by candlelight. Clan members and their guests welcome.

Saturday 28th May

10.30 hrs for 11.00 hrs. AGM. Garlieston Village Hall. Clan members and their guests welcome. Free of charge, no ticket required.

13.00 hrs. Buffet lunch following AGM. Tickets £10 per person. Clan members and their guests welcome.

15.00 hrs. Piping in the Colours at Sorbie Tower. Free of charge, no ticket required, all welcome.

18.30 hrs for 19.00 hrs prompt. Clan Dinner Dance at the Creebridge House Hotel, Newton Stewart. Tickets £28 per adult, £14 per child up to 12 years. Please note that under 12s will receive a child’s portion dinner. Clan members and their guests welcome.

Sunday 29th May

12.00 hrs onwards. Picnic with Clan games at Sorbie Tower. Bring your own picnic and watch or take part in the Clan games, which are open to all, adults and children. Free of charge, no ticket required, all welcome.

Accommodation

The Creebridge House Hotel is offering a special Bed and Breakfast rate for Clan members of £60 per night for a single room, and £85 per night for a double or twin room, if booked directly with the hotel before May 1st.

For information on accommodation, transport, places to eat and visitor attractions, go to the Visit Scotland website.

Some camping will be available on site. Contact Stephen Hanna to arrange this as space will be limited.

Coronavirus

We are monitoring the ongoing Coronavirus situation carefully and are hopeful that the Gathering will go ahead as planned this year, however we are unable to guarantee that it will take place. In the event that the Gathering is cancelled, all monies paid for tickets will be refunded.

If you are planning to attend, please check the website for updates.

The Hanneys of Oxfordshire

Church of St. James the Great, West Hanney

Church of St. James the Great, West Hanney

Next time you hear someone refer to visiting “The Hanneys,” they may mean the place and not the family.

Water both binds and divides the sister villages of East and West Hanney, located in the Vale of White Horse, Oxfordshire. These two picturesque townships are known as “island villages,” as they were historically surrounded by marshland. The area between them silted up over the years, such that they are now separated only by a single field.

Causeways through the two villages now keep the water under control for the most part, though until very recently the two villages still might be cut off from each other in wet weather. The region remains very fertile, though some parts are still prone to flooding. Archaeological evidence, some dug up during metal detecting rallies in 2009-2010, shows the area has been variously settled for over 5000 years. The region may well have been the home of Saxon nobles, as well as various estates.

Philberd's Manor and passing brook, East Hanney

Philberd’s Manor and passing brook, East Hanney

But what about that name? The “Hanneys” designation flows out of this geography. The “ey” suffix is from “ieg,” meaning “island” in Anglo-Saxon. “Henn” is the feminine “hen” (“henna” is listed as a masculine, meaning “fowl.”) More concisely, David Nash Ford defines the name as “Cock Island,” attributing the Hanney moniker to the preponderance of wild birds, many presumably waterfowl, in this swamp-rich district.

 


Sources in rough order of appearance:

Images

  • Steel, Trish. “The Church of St. James the Great, West Hanney.” Wikimedia Commons, tinyurl.com/3zbnjspa. Retrieved 16 Nov. 2021. CC BY-SA 2.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0>, via Wikimedia Commons.
  • Diment, Keith. “Philberd’s Manor in East Hanney.” The Hanneys, https://thehanneys.uk/. Retrieved 16 Nov. 2021.

For more good images of the area, you might check out this gallery, with more work by local photographer Keith Diment.

 

 

Robert Silver Hannay, D-Day Veteran, US Navy

Many young men volunteered for service in the Second World War. One such was Robert Hannay from Salem, Ohio, USA. He was born on July 14, 1926, the son of Frank and Helen Louise (Silver) Hannay. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy in 1943 as a Seaman 1st Class at the young age of 17 to serve his country as America responded to the twin threats of the Nazis and Imperial Japan during World War 2. He went through basic training at the Great Lakes Naval Base in Chicago and then on to a Brooklyn Navy base where he was assigned to a landing craft as a gunner on a Higgins Tank Carrier landing craft that was outfitted near New York. He was transferred to England via Nova Scotia with his craft, LST-281. The craft was capable of landing a sizeable number of men, their equipment and tanks to shore without the need for a harbour in an amphibious landing. His first substantive action was on D Day, June 6th 1944, at Omaha Beach in Normandy, France, where he acted as a loader to the 200mm gun beside his partner, the shooter. After the beach was secured, tanks were unloaded. Hannay stayed on the craft as a gunner watching history and carnage unfolding in front of his eyes as an 18 year-old. He later remarked that the Hollywood movie, ‘Saving Private Ryan’ was the best movie ever made and very accurate to what happened that day.

After the Normandy landings he was transferred to the Mediterranean and took part in the amphibious landing at Corsica off the coast of France along with the subsequent invasion of southern France. During that assault his boat was beached by a retreating tide and it became a sitting duck to the Nazis. The crew put up a dirigible balloon to deter air attacks but that invited incoming 88mm shells. He recalled one such shell going by so close that he could feel the breeze from it as it whistled past. They were fortunate not to be hit and the captain let the balloon loose so that allied air planes spotted them and took out the German gun.

Hannay and his crew were then transferred to the Pacific theatre of the war and were part of the American Army’s island hopping towards Japan. During the Okinawa landings his craft went in behind a smoke screen but was spotted by a kamikaze aircraft coming straight at them. Their guns were not big enough to take it out, but fortunately a nearby destroyer downed the plane before it hit their landing craft.

Hannay served two years and three months in the US Navy in total before being discharged after the war. He receiving the American Campaign Medal, European African Middle Eastern Service Medal with two Bronze Campaign Stars for Normandy and Southern France, Asiatic-Pacific Service Medal with one Bronze Campaign Star for the Okinawa Invasion, the Philippines Liberation Medal, WWII Victory Medal and subsequently in 2016 he was made a Knight of the Legion of Honour that was bestowed by France to all surviving D Day Veterans.

He returned home to Ohio after the war, completed his education, got several jobs in the automotive industry culminating in his working for General Motors in Lordstown as an assembler for 25 years, retiring in 1991. He married Mildred “Millie” Grace Smith on September 4th, 1948 and had two daughters, Shirley and Sharon. He loved to do woodworking during his retirement and golfing at the Salem Hills Golf Course. His wife, Millie preceded him in death on October 31st, 2016 and he died quietly on the 27th January 2019 in Ohio aged 92 years. He leaves behind four grandchildren and three great grandchildren as well as his daughters. He is one of the last of the brave men who fought for freedom and liberty from tyranny in World War 2.

References:

 

 

Ted Hanney (1889-1964)

by Robert Keith Hanna, Clan Hannay Genealogist

originally published in the 2016 Clan Hannay Newsletter


Olympic Gold Medalist and Somme Veteran, Ted Hanney (1889-1964)

In a year that celebrates both the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro and the centenary of the Battle of the Somme in World War I, it is good to reflect on the life and career of Ted Hanney, Olympic Gold Medalist in 1912 for GB, and a veteran of the Somme battlefield. Terence Percival (“Ted”) Hanney (1889-1964) was born on 19 January 1889 in Reading, Berkshire, the youngest of three children born to John Hanney, the Quartermaster Sergeant of the Royal Berks Regiment, and his wife Henrietta. Hanney spent his early years at Reading’s Brock Barracks before moving to the Duke of York’s Royal Military Asylum in Chelsea aged 11 for his education. He then enlisted in his father’s regiment as a boy solider and would go on to serve eight years before leaving the Army in 1911 as a corporal to become a footballer.

He was a tall, dashing defender – tough, but also quick and skillful. After a number of England amateur caps, he was selected for the 1912 British Olympic squad for Sweden and played in Great Britain’s pivotal 7-0 win over Hungary. Sadly, he sustained an injury and was forced to watch from the sidelines as his team won gold versus Denmark (4-2) and he never received a medal despite his participation to that point.

1912 Great Britain Gold Medal-Winning Football Team: Back, f. l. t. r. Horace Littlewort, Dr. Ronald Brebner, Arthur Berry, Harold Walden, Vivian Woodward, Gordon Hoare, Ivan Sharp, Arthur Knight; Front, f. l. t. r. James Dines, Thomas Burn, Edward Hanney.

On returning to England in 1912 he signed professional forms for Reading FC and shortly afterwards was sold to Manchester City for a huge fee for the time, £1,250. Soon, though, the First World War came for Ted and all four of his brothers. From the prestige of a big money move to Manchester City, Ted enlisted in 1915 and found himself a world away at the battle of the Somme in northern France at a place called Delville Wood, nicknamed “Devil’s Wood” by fellow soldiers, where he had risen to the rank of sergeant. Delville Wood was a central point of the battle of the Somme that saw an unprecedented 60,000 British casualties on the first day of fighting alone, July 1st 1916.

Hanney was part of the British 2nd Division that was held back until the 27th July. With nine shells per second raining down and the stench of weeks-old bodies rotting in the French summer sun, Ted first survived a nearby grenade explosion which killed a fellow soldier but only left him dazed. He carried on regardless, but a shell then badly wounded him with shrapnel in the thigh, face and neck at 10.30pm on 28th July 1916. He had to remain out in the trenches without proper medical attention until 8.30am the next morning to avoid gunfire. Despite his injuries, Ted later said;

“The Germans counter attacked three times that night, and as I felt quite alright, I stopped and gave them a few extra rounds of ammunition. By gum, I saw some fights I shall never forget.”

In August he was sent back to England to recover, and after undergoing surgery to remove shrapnel from his face he was discharged from hospital in September and sent to the Eastern Command Depot at Shoreham, Sussex. In January 1917 Hanney was posted to Chatham, Kent where he remained for the duration of the war. He was finally discharged from the British Army on 25th March 1919. During active service he had suffered facial scarring, damage to the right shoulder and, most significantly for his footballing career, a torn adductor muscle in his right leg. He played for a time with Coventry City and then for Reading again before retiring in 1922.

Incredibly, a few years after his retirement, he coached in Germany with VfB Stuttgart, whom he led to the Württemberg-Baden regional championship in 1927, and FC Wacker München, where he also found some success. Hanney returned to Reading before the Second World War, during which he ran coaching sessions at his former club. He ended his days as the landlord of the Russell Arms public house, 2-4 Bedford Road, Reading, Berkshire (now renamed The Royal pub) and died on his way to hospital after collapsing at Reading’s Salisbury Club on the 30th November 1964. He never married.