Did the Hannay Surname Originate in Anwoth?

A new potential source for the Hannay surname has been noted within a medieval document. In The Hannays of Sorbie, 4th Edition (p. 5), Stewart Francis and Frank Lawler note that Robert de Veterponte gave the church and lands of Lesser Sowerby to the church in 1240.

Cardoness Castle in Kirkcudbrightshire

The document conveying this property is described in the POMS (Persons of Medieval Scotland) database as follows:

Robert de Vieuxpont [i.e., Veterponte; the spelling of the name varied as you will see throughout this article] has given, granted, and by his charter established, to Dryburgh Abbey, in free, pure and perpetual alms, to the increase of the church of Little Sorbie (WIG) which he bestowed on them, the land in the said villa [township or community, i.e. Sorbie village] which extends in length by the little cross which is situated in the western part of the church, towards the old road which descends from the land of William de Anewith from the east of the said villa.

Source: Document 3/590/16 (Dryb. Lib., no. 73) , https://www.poms.ac.uk/record/source/5498/ as viewed on April 15, 2020.

This description of the document thus indicates that William de Anewith was a neighbor to the east of Robert de Vieuxpont, and to the east of the community of Sorbie. This corresponds very well to the location of Sorbie Tower.

The original source of the record is in Latin, and is transcribed as follows:

Omnibus Christi fidelibus etc. Robertus de Veteri ponte salutem. Noverit universitas vestra me divine pietatis intuitu dedisse concessisse et hac presenti carta mea confirmasse Deo et ecclesie sancte Marie de Driburgh et fratribus meis canonicis ibidem Deo servientibus et servituris in liberam puram et perpetuam elemosinam ad incrementum ecclesie de minore Sowrby quam eisdem caritative contuli totam terram illam in dicta villa que se extendit in longum a parva cruce que sita est in occidentali parte ecclesie ville prenominate usque ad antiquum rivulum illum qui descendit de terra Willelmi de Anewith ex orientali parte predicte ville et que in latum se extendit a publica et antiqua via ex australi parte dicte ecclesie existente usque ad parvam crucem illam que sita est in aquilonali parte prefate ville sicut terram illam presatis canonicis coram probis hominibus perambulare et mensurare feci. Tenendam inperpetuum pro salute animarum patris mei et matris mee et pro salute anime mee et uxoris mee et pro salute omnium antecessorum et successorum meorum adeo libere quiete et plenarie et honorifice sicuti aliqua elemosina in toto regno Scotie ab aliquibus viris religiosis liberius quietius plenius et honorificentius potest teneri vel possideri. Ut hec autem mea donatio libera perpetuum robur firmitatis optineat presenti scripto sigillum meum apponi feci. Testibus. 

Confirmacio capituli Witernie super minore Sowrby in proprios usus.

Source: John Spottiswood, Liber S. Marie de Dryburgh, Registrum cartarum Abbacie Premonstratensis de Dryburgh (Bannatyne Club, Edinburgh, 1847) Document 73 p. 54, https://ia800207.us.archive.org/32/items/libersmariededry00bann/libersmariededry00bann.pdf as viewed on April 15, 2020.

I have no academic knowledge of medieval Latin personally, but have used online tools, primarily Google Translate to arrive at the following rough translation:

To all the faithful etc. from Robert De Vipont, greetings: Know that I have with divine piety conceded that the present charter confirms before God that, to the church of St. Mary, Driburgh, and my brothers canons there serving the same God, in a free and perpetual charitable gift for the growth of the Church of Lower Sowrby, I present the whole of that land in the said community, from a small cross, which was situated in the west part of the church of the aforesaid town, even to the ancient stream which came down out of the land of William of Anewith on the eastern side of the aforesaid town, to which it extends, and from the ancient road on the southern side of the church cross to the northern part of the aforementioned community. To be held in perpetuity, for the salvation of my soul and the souls of my father and mother and for the salvation of the souls of me and of my wife and for the salvation of all my predecessors and my successors, as freely and honorably as any religious alms can be throughout the whole kingdom of Scotland can be committed. This is my gift which I deliver with the assurance of my seal. Witnesses.

Confirmation of the capital Witernie (Whithorn) the lower Sowrby for their own use.

This seems to agree with the POMS characterization of the William de Anewith land being to the east of the town of Sorbie. Could Anewith be a predecessor to the Hannay surname?

Consider the attestation to the Ragman Rolls in 1296 by “Gilbert de Hannethe” and  “Gilbert de Annethe,” both of whom are described as “del counte Wyggeton” (the county of Wigtown).

Source: Instrumenta Publica Sive Processus Super Fidelitatibus Et Homagiis Scotorum Domino Regi Angliae Factus, A.D 1291-1296 (Bannatyne Club 1834) p.145-146, https://deriv.nls.uk/dcn23/7981/79811991.23.pdf, as viewed on April 15, 2020.  

These two names were written by clerks who were using French, the language of the Ragman Rolls and certain English legal proceedings of the time, hearkening back to the Norman roots of the English monarchy.

These clerks undoubtedly did their best to negotiate the mix of Gaelic, Brittonic, Germanic and Scandinavian spellings they encountered in much of Scotland. The spelling Anewith is not native to either French or Latin. In Latin, the letter W does not exist. It was first used by scribes writing old English in Latinized characters, replacing the runic letter Wynn (Ƿ) in old English.

Source: Latin Language (Lingua Latina),  https://www.omniglot.com/writing/latin2.htm as viewed on April 15, 2020.

In French, the letter W is used solely in loan words from other languages; it was not added to the French alphabet until the 19th century.

How Is W Pronounced in French? See https://www.thoughtco.com/french-pronunciation-of-w-1369605, as viewed on April 15, 2020.

The letter H in French is always silent.

Source: French Pronunciation of the Letter H, https://www.thoughtco.com/french-pronunciation-of-h-1369563, as viewed on April 15, 2020.

Given these circumstances, it is not hard to understand how Anewith might have been spelled without a W by the scribes, and the addition of an H would not change the sound. The scribes thus got the basic consonant sounds, other than the H and W, correct with their spelling of Anewith as Annethe and Hannethe.

Well prior to the time of the Ragman Rolls, the language of the common people in southwest Scotland was Gaelic.

For at least 600 years, between the tenth and the sixteenth centuries, Galloway was a Gaelic speaking land. Although both the beginning and the end of Gaelic Galloway are uncertain, that Gaelic was the language of the kingdom of Galloway established by Fergus in the early eleventh century, and was still the main language of the Douglas lordship of Galloway at its end in 1455, is indisputable.

Source: Alistair Livingstone,  GAELIC IN GALLOWAY: PART ONE – EXPANSION, Transactions of the Dumfriesshire and Galloway Natural History and Antiquities Society,  3rd Series Vol. 85 p. 85 (2011), http://www.dgnhas.org.uk/tdgnhas/3085.pdf as viewed on April 15, 2020.

This may help to explain further change to the name Anewith. In Gaelic, th is pronounced as an h is in English today.

Source: Mark Jackson, The Unofficial Guide to Pronouncing Gaelic, https://cuhwc.org.uk/page/unofficial-guide-pronouncing-gaelic as viewed on April 15, 2020. With both the W and TH sounds gone, Anewith becomes Aneih, pretty close to Hannay.

The name Anewith appears in several other medieval records. The only other person found who is identified with a surname of Anewith is a Henry de Anewith, who was a witness to the conveyance of an interest in animals stolen by a knight. The witness occurred at Westminister, and the theft occurred on land near Baulking, England.

Source: Berkeley Castle Muniments, John de Neubir and Sir Gerard de Insula, knight. Sat. after St. Mark, 14 Edw. I, BCM/B/1/2/5, April 27, 1286, http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/e10ec87e-a8b5-4d2a-af26-07b49ec7c1e4, as viewed on April 15, 2020.

There is a more telling reference to Anewith in Scottish records, however. In his Ph.D thesis, Richard Oram discusses one potential settlement of a Norman in Galloway, at Anwoth, as follows:

David, son of Terrus, is one of the more problematical members of the group. He appears to have been lord of part of Over Denton in Gilsland (42) in eastern Cumberland, quite removed from Uhtred’s area of knowledge in Allerdale. He received the lordship of Anwoth in the hilly district to the west of the river Fleet, the parish church of which he bestowed on his overlord’s favoured monastery of Holyrood. (43) Evidence for his activities in Galloway are otherwise slim; he appears on only one other occasion in surviving documents, as a witness to Uhtred’s grant of Lochkindeloch to Richard, son of Troite. (44) David’s son, Nicholas, was a witness to the same charter and itis probably his son, also Nicholas, who as lord of Cardoness, the caput of Anwoth, makes his appearance in possesion (sic) of the estate in the early 13th century. (45) Another descendant may have been a certain William de Anwoth who was holding land near Sorbie in Wigtownshire in c. 1220. (46)

Source: Richard D. Oram, The Lordship of Galloway, Ph. D. Thesis, St. University of St. Andrews, 1989, https://research-repository.st-andrews.ac.uk/bitstream/10023/2638/3/RDOramPhDThesis.pdf, as viewed on April 15, 2020.

Footnote 43 in this paragraph references a document in the Holyrood records. The transcribed Latin record spells the name Anwoth as Anewith.

Source: Lord Francis Egerton, Liber Cartarum Sancte Crucis. Munimenta Ecclesie Sancte Crucis de Edwinesburg, Document 49, p. 38 (Bannatyne Club,  1840), https://archive.org/details/libercartarumsan00bann/page/38/mode/2up/search/anewith, as viewed on April 15, 2020.

Note that I have not attempted a translation of the Latin in this document; however, the word Anewith is clear in the transcribed text.

Oram also cites in footnote 46 the document noted earlier which places William de Anewith’s land next to Robert Veteripont in Sorbie parish. Oram speculates that William may be a descendant of David son of Terrus, whose other descendant became Lord Cardoness at Anwoth. To date, I have found no indication that William was a descendant of David of Terrus. The Wigtownshire Charters, the source for David son of Terrus also having property in Gilsland, Cumberland, say the following about him:

Amongst these Anglo-Norman settlers was one David, son of Terri, who was lord of Over Denton in Gilsland. To him Roland (Lord of Galloway 1185-1200, ed.) must have granted Anwoth and what is now the Cardoness Estate. Indeed, his descendants or successors adopted the name de Cardones. David is the only settler who may be said definitely to have held by ward relief and marriage. His mote-The Green Tower mote on the Boreland farm-and perhaps his memorial cross an Anworth (sic) Kirk are still to be seen. At some unknown date before 1450 the estate passed to the McCullochs, who held by the same service as late as 1528. The fee stretched from the Fleet to Kirkmabreck. David, as patron of a moiety of Over Denton, granted that church to Lanercost and followed it with a gift of the church at Anwoth and the chapel of Culenes to Holyrood abbey.

Source: Vol. 51, 3rd Series Publications of the Scottish History Society, R.C. Reid ed., Wigtownshire Charters, xxiii (Edinburgh 1960), https://digital.nls.uk/scottish-history-society-publications/browse/archive/126819135#?c=0&m=0&s=0&cv=4&xywh=-854%2C0%2C3357%2C2755 as viewed on April 15, 2020.

The records for David, son of Terri, regarding the Gilsland property may be published now in Todd, John M., ed. (1997). The Lanercost Cartulary (Cumbria County Record Office MS DZ/1), Surtees Society. I have not been able to review them. Gilsland is very close to Hadrian’s Wall, near its midpoint.

Oram suggests the possibility that William de Anewith was a descendant of David, son of Terrus, an Anglo-Norman knight and the patriarch of the de Cardoness estate. In another paper, it will be shown that the largest group of Hannay related surnamed participants with a common ancestor in the middle ages appear to descend, on male lines, from men who had been in the British Isles and Ireland since the Neolithic era. There are many ways this could happen despite the origin of the family name coming from an Anewith family that was of Anglo-Norman background. Adoption of surnames when male ancestral lines end is not uncommon. Note also that McCulloughs were successors to the de Cardoness estate in the 14th century. The McCullough family has YDNA matches to apparent Hannay descendants.  These issues will be discussed further in a later paper. At this time, it is fair to say that the Anewith/Anwoth origin thesis is plausible and should be evaluated further.

The Chief, Professor David Hannay, comments:

Concerning Anwoth, the only connection I know of, is that my grandfather, Col. Frederick Rainsford-Hannay of Kirkdale, lived with my grandmother at Cardoness in the parish of Anwoth, after her only brother was killed in the first World War.

The description of Sowrby (which may or may not be our Sorbie) states that:-
“an ancient stream which comes down out of the land of William of Anewith on the eastern side of the aforesaid town”.

This strongly suggests that the land of William of Anewith was at least near to the Sowrby mentioned.  Anwoth is a former parish 30 miles from Sorbie. The old ruined church there is early 17th century and the nearby Cardoness castle is 15th century. I do not think there is a connection between Anwoth in Kircudbrightshire and Sorbie in Wigtownshire.

THE ARMS OF SORBIE (Clan West Archive)

From the Clan West Archive – Originally published December 9, 2011.  This is part of a series of articles that were initially published by the now-inactive Clan Hannay Society West.  Many thanks to Gigi Hanna, Convenor Emerita.

Note: This article reflects the views of the author at the time it was written and may contain information inconsistent with more recent research into family history.  For further study, we refer readers to The Hannays of Sorbie by Stewart Francis and Hanna of the Close by Keith Hanna.


by THEODORE A. HANNA, Jr.

The heraldry of the Clan evolved in the first half of the 12th century, and by the 13th century, heraldry had become a scientific system of identification.

In those early days, few could read or write, and heraldry supplied the people with an easy means of readily identifying their Kings and Chiefs.

Knights and nobles wore boldly colored devices on their shields to identify them in tournaments and on the battlefield. Later, these devices were worn on their mantles (coats) and the fabrics draped over their war horses to protect the animals from wounds incurred in the heat of battle. Hence the term, “Coat-of-Arms”.

Tradition tells us that a Hanna took up the cross, and accompanied Richard I, also known as Coeur de Lion, or Lion Heart, in the early 1190s to take part in the Third Crusade; to free the Holy Lands of Palestine from the grip of the infidel Saracen. All of the Christian Knights of the time wore the symbol of the Cross on his dress, at least for the duration of his time while on Crusade.

The taking up of the Cross was a very serious business, not to be taken lightly. The Chief or Nobleman doing so had to bear the cost of provisioning, arming, and transporting his Knights, servants and vassals, and horses; over several thousands of miles, and ofttimes for extended periods of time, up to several years. Maintaining such contingents would cost hundreds of thousands of dollars, perhaps even millions, by today’s standards. Therefore the Hannas had to be extremely wealthy in their own right to be able to afford such a venture.

While the Chief and his warrior Clansmen were off on these forays, the Lady of the household was charged with the responsibility of managing these vast estates, with only the household servants and non-warrior tenants and kin. The Chief’s lands were then vulnerable to attack, which sometimes happened, in spite of the guarantees given by the Pope in return for service to the Church.

Crest of the Clan Hanna

The Herald Nisbet, writing about the year 1700 gives the Hanna Crest and Motto a Crusader origin. His “book of Galloway” states:

“A family which has dealt many blows in time of war from Flodden Field to the Gates of Rhodes, and for some such service bore heraldic device of a crescent and fitched cross”.

It is then obvious that this Hanna was successful in personally defeating Saracens in combat. From this activity, the Hanna, adopted the Cross-crosslet (each of the arms and the head of the cross being again crossed), fitched (that is the base of the cross being pointed) issuing out of a Crescent; sable (sable is the color black for piety). This arrangement depicting victory over the Muslim Saracen.

Later, the Chief of the Clan, wore this symbol on his helmet, and other head wear: Hence the reference to this device as being a crest. He would then have made up duplicates of his crest, in pewter or bronze castings, mounted on a leather strap. These he would then issue to his sons, family members, knights, household guards and servants.

By Scottish Heraldic law, only the Chief of the Clan is allowed to wear the Crest without the strap adornment; as the Crest is his. The rest of us as Clansmen, can wear the Crest on our bonnets as long as the Crest is enclosed within the “Belted Circle”. The belted circle is now a part of the casting and is representative of the leather strap mounting of old.

As Clansmen, we may also use the Crest on letterheads, and other items, if it is enclosed within the belted circle and is accompanied with the words “Cirean Ceann Cinnidh”; in Gaelic meaning “crest of the Chief (or head) of the Children (family)”.

A Coat of Arms is the general term applied to the whole armorial device, and is technically called an “Achievement”. This consists of the following main parts and, for illustration purposes, we will use the Coat of Arms of our Chiefs – The Ahannas of Sorbie.

The Arms: the shield and the devices or “charges” on it.

For the Hannays of Sorbie, this is “Argent three Roebucks heads couped azure, collared or, with a bell pendant gules.”

The Helmet: there are special types for Royalty, Peers, Knights and Baronets, Feudal Barons, Esquires and Gentle men.

The Mantling: originally the cloth hanging down from the helmet. Its useful purpose was to insulate the Knight from the heat of the sun on his armor. The mantling is of the principal colors of the family.

Hannays of Sorbie: Argent (silver) and azure (blue)

The Wreath: Also known as the Torse. A skein of silk covers the join between the Crest and the Mantling, and consists of six alternative twists of the livery (colors) of the family. This adornment probably came from the Crusades, when the torse actually held the mantle to the helmet; much as the Arabs head band held his protective mantle in place about his head and shoulders.

Hannays of Sorbie: Argent and azure.

The Motto: originated on the standard and seal.

Hannays of Sorbie: Per Ardua Ad Alta – though hardship to the highest places or enlightenment.

Supporters: are only granted to peers; Knights Grand Cross; Heirs, male and female of the minor barons of Scot land and Chiefs of Old Families and Clans.

The Hannas of Mochrum were created Baronets of Nova Scotia (New Scotland), Canada, in 1629, and their supporters were two Roebucks proper (natural colors).

Several branches of the family have, over the years, registered Arms with the Lord Lyon, the Heraldic Officer for Scotland. Mostly they derive from those of the Chief – Ahannay of Sorbie, and they are to be found in the Heraldic registers of Scotland, England and Ireland.

However, each of these branches must display differences in their arms, and there are prescribed devices to differentiate from the arms of the Chief, as only the Chief may display his arms, as they are equivalent to his signature. As an example: the arms of Kirkdale originally contained a mullet (star) to designate the owner as a third son of Sorbie. Due to the demise of the Sorbie branch of the family, the Sorbie arms have been granted to the Kirkdale house, without difference, designating Kirkdale as the Chiefly line of the family.

The Will of William Hannay of Grennan

The following material was an appendix in editions 1-3 of The Hannays of Sorbie. In the process of editing the new 4th Edition (release date to be announced), this section was removed from the upcoming book. As we still wish to maintain the source material for research purposes, however, we are posting it here.

The will of William Hannay of Grennan (died 1573; see Chapter XII: The Hannays of Grennan) as transcribed by Stewart Francis in earlier editions:

“The Testament dative and inventar of the guides geir soumes of money and fettis pertaining to unquihile Williame Hannay in Gren[FL1] nane within the Parochin of Glenluce in Galloway the tyme of his decies quha decsit in the moneth of July the year of God jm V c Lxxiij yearis. fatthfullie maid and given up by himself as concerning the nomination dettis awin to him and dettis awand be him and partlie maid and given up be Marion McBryde his relict Hew Marjorie and Katherine Hannay is his lauchfull barne ownlie now on lyf as concerning the inventar of his guides and gier quhome he nominat his executoris in his lattir will underwritten of the date the secondday of July the yeir of god foirsaid befoir thir witness is Alexander McBryd in Ballmurry Andro Hannay Patrik Hannay Gilbert Hannay in Drygowis Andro Hannay his sone and Dene John Sanderis vivcar of Glenluce with untheris divers.

In primis the said umquhile Williame Hannay had the guides geir soumes of money and dettis of the avale and prices eftir following pertening to him the tyme of his deceis foirsaid viz. tuentie nyny ky price of the pece ourhied Vii summa j c xlv Li

·        Item viij quoyis of thrie yeir auldis price of the pece iij li. summa xxiiij li.

·        Item viij quoy beistis of tua yeir auldis price of the pece ourhied xl s summa xvj li.

·        Item ten stirkis of ane yeir auldis price of the pece xx s. summa x li.

·        Item xiij auld oxin price of the pece ourhied vj li summa xxviij li.

·        Item with Gilbert Hannay in Dygowis tua oxin price of the pece vj li summa xij li.

·        Item foure stottis of thrie yeir auldis price of the pece xi s summa viij li. Item ellevin scoir of auld schepe price of the pece ourhied xvjs. summa j c Lxxxj li .

·        Item Lx lambes price of the pece vj s. viij d. summa xx li.

·        Item fyve hon, price of the pece ourheid x merkis summa L merkis.

·        Item viij meris price of the pece v li summa xi li.

·        Item tua staigis of tua yeir auldis price of the pece Ls. summa v li.

·        Item thrie staigia of ane yeir auldis price of the pece xxxiij s. iiij d. summa v li

·        Item sawin on the grund ane boll bier estimat to the ferd corne extending to iiij bollis beir price of the boll with the fodder iiij merkis summa xvj markis.

·        Item xlv bollis aitt is sew in estimat to the third corne ex tending to vj xv bollis aittis price of the boll with the fodder ijJ merkis summa i c lxxx li.

·        Item in utencilis and domicilis with the abulzementis of his body estimat to sextene poundis. summa of the inventa vij c Lxxxxj li

Followis the debts awand to the deid

·        Item ther was awand to the said umquhile William Hannay be Gildert McCoull in Barlokkart tua hundreth merkis

·        Item awand be Alexander MaKilroy in Glenchymmar thrie schepe of fyve yeir auldis price of the pece xvj s summa xlviij s. Item be John McBryd fyve merkis Item awand be Marion Kennedy in areiss vj li x s wherof the defunct ordainis thrie pund to be given to John Hannay in Lochranald to releeve him of caution swa restis awand to him be hir de clara iij li x s.

·        Item awand be Alexander McKie in Martoun for the price of ane broun hors xvi j li Item awand be Gilbert Hannay bruther to the defunct fortie griet groittis in lent money price of the pece xviij d summa iij li. summa of the dettis awand to the deid j c.Lxi j li. xjj s. iiij d. summa of the inventar with the dettis ix c. Liij li xj s. ii i j d.

Followis the dettis awand be the deid

·        Item ther was. awand be the said umquhile William Hannay to the laird of Barnebarrocht for coft aittis xxvj merkis

·        Item mair to the said laird of the rest of ane greter soum xx merkis

·        Item to Andro McCulvie for come xx li Item to Sir Harbert Andersoun vj li. vj s. viij d.

·        Item to Alexander McBryd in Balmurry iij li Item to William Carstane in Cluquhane for thrie yeiris nultar bipast vj hollis aittis price of the boll ourheid xxx s. summa ix li.

·        Item to Archibald Kennedy iii li for the Whitsunday male Item to the abbay of Glenluce for six hollis teind meill of Grenane of the crop in anno 1572 yeiris xi j li.

·        Item to the said abbay for tua hollis teind meill of Glenchymmer of the same crop iiij li. Item to James Hannay xxxv li.

·        Item to John Hannay his bruthir x merkis Item to Gilbert Stevin in Custreauch iijj li xs. for tua hollis aittis coft Item to Michaell Makilroy in Arebig xxxv s for ane boll of corne Item to my lord of Cassilis of stent silver upon the Cheinis vj li

·        Item to Margaret Storie Johne McCulvie wyf vj li. Item to for mawing of the medow xxxv s ltetm to John McCairdy for his fie xxiij s. iiij d.

·        Item to Marion Aschellane and Malie McMurries xiij s. i iij d.

·        Item to Gilbert Aschellane bird of fie vj s viij d. Item to Fergus McKie restand of ane ox price xxxvjs viij d.

·        Item to Archibald Kennedy for mertymes male of Grenene in anno 1573 viij li

·        Item to the place of Glenluce for teind me ill in anno aforesaid vj hollis tiend meill price theof xi j li.

·        Item to Niniane Carsane myllar for multour tua hollis aittis price iiij merkis

As to the abbottis dettis awand be Johne McDonald in areis the said John at his lattir will commandit the laird of Gartland and Johns wyf to releve me of all thir dettis conforme to thir promeis Summa of the dettis awand be the deid j c lxxv li vj s viij d; Restis of frie geir and dettis deductit vij c lxxviij li iiij s viij d. to be devidit in thrie partis the deidis part is ij c lix li viij s ij d Quairy the quot is componit for viii ji li Followis the deidis legacie and lattir will, Upon the secund day of July the yeir of god j m cv lxxiij veris the quahilk day the said William Hannay in Grenane being seik in body and haill in mynd maid his lattir will and legacie as follows vic Imprimis I leve all my titill rychts and kyndness of all my takkis and stedingis to Hew Hannay my sone quha failzeing to my dochters successive thay being mfiriet upoun anne Hannay

·        Item to Gilbert Hannay my bruther ten pund or ane naig worth ten pund

·        Item to George Hannay ane bruon naig in his ane hand To Margaret Hannay fyve merkis in hir husbands hand To Jonet Hannay Fynlay Hannay dochter tua pectis mele yeirlil.! for six yeirs to cum to Williame Myllar in Lochrannell thrie pectis aittis for all biganes or thrie pundes money to the vicares tua wadderis

·        Item ordainis my wyf to hald Johne Hannay James Hannay brother with myn awne barnes quhill they cum to perfyt age and depe the ten merkis in the mene tyme and theirafter deliver him the said x merkis

To George McColme wyf and hir sister ane hors and ane ox in their awne handis And George McColme to tak his chois To Alexander Hannay of Sorbie my best gray hors for maintanance and defending of my barnes Sen nothing is mair certaine nor the deid and na thing mair uncertane nor the hour of deid quairfor I William Hannay seik in body Haill in my mind and spirit makis my testament and lattir will in maner following:

First randir and committis my saule to almychtie god my creatour to abyd with all the blissit cumpany in hevin and ordainis my body to be buriet in St Michaellis Kirk in Glenluce and ordainis constitutis and creattis my executour Marion McBryde my spous and all my barnes above written and intromittoris with all my guides and geir and ordainis Alexander Hannay of Sorbie overman and defender of my wyf and barnes and ordainis my wyf and barnes to remane togidder in all my roumes induring her widoheid and grif scho maries with advys of the said laird of Sorbie scho to remane in lykmanner in roumes with my barnes to thir perfyt age Failzeing therof the roumes to be left to the barnes and that they use the councill of the said overman.

This present testament wes maid in the said William duelling place in Grenane before me Sir Johne Sanderis vicar of Glenluce day year and moneth abovewritten befior thir witnesses Alexander McBryd in Balmurry Andro Hannay Patrick Hannay Gilbert Hannay in Dargowis and Andro Hannay his sone with divers others.

Sic subscribitur Ita est Dominus Joannes Sanderis Vallislucis vicarius ac minister manu propria.

We Messers Edward Henrysoun doctor in the vis Alexander Sym and Johne Prestoun advocattis commissaris of Edinburgh speciale constituit for confirming of testamentis be the tennour herof satisfies approvis and confirms this present testament in sa far as the samin is duelie and lachfullie maid of the guidis and geir above specificet alanerlie and gives and committis the intromission with the samin to the said Marion McBryd relict Hew Marjorie and Katherine Hannay is the only baimes now on lyf to the said umquhile William Hannay and executouris testamentaris to him Reservand compt to be maid be thame therof as accordis of the law and the said executoris being suoune haif maid fayth truelie to exerce the said office and haif fundin caution that the guides and geir abovewritten sal be furthcumand to al parteis havand interes as law will as ane act maid therupon beris.”

 


The Stewart Family and the Grennan Hannays

The following material was an appendix in editions 1-3 of The Hannays of Sorbie. In the process of editing the new 4th Edition (release date to be announced), this section was removed from the upcoming book. As we still wish to maintain the source material for research purposes, however, we are posting it here.

In the 16th Century, the Hannays of Grennan married into the family of
Alexander Stewart, the 3rd Laird of Garlies and Dalswinton

Parish Lists from 1684

The following material was an appendix in editions 1-3 of The Hannays of Sorbie. In the process of editing the new 4th Edition (release date to be announced), this section was removed from the upcoming book. As we still wish to maintain the source material for research purposes, however, we are posting it here.

            Appendix A: Parish Lists, 1684

To illustrate the variations in the spelling of the family name in Galloway in the 17th century, here follows an extract from parish records. It also gives an example of the effect of the religious enforcement laws upon the populace. Each parish minister was required to produce a list like the following.  It showed all persons over twelve years of age so the magistrates could administer the Test. These lists were required as of October 15, 1684.

 

Parish

First Name

Last Name

Notes

Glasserton.

Alexander

Hannay

 

Arbrick.

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Cottars.

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Cottars.

 

William

Hannay

 

Cottars.

 

Robert

Hannay

 

Cottars.

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

Cottars.

 

Michael

Hannay

 

Challochblewan.

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Challochblewan.

 

Elspeth

Hannay

 

Challochblewan.

 

Jean

Hannay

 

Glaston.

 

Christian

Hannay

 

Cottars.

Glenluce.

Alexander

Hannay

 

Gillespie.

 

Mary

Hannay

 

Cullfassen.

 

Mary

Hannay

wyf of John Torbran

Culfassen.

 

Patrick

Hannay

 

Gass.

 

William

Hannay

 

in Glenchalmer, Glenchalmer.

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Ball nell.

 

James

Hannay

 

Galldannoch.

 

John

Hannay

 

and his wyf, Grennan.

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Grennan.

 

William

Hannay

 

Grennan.

 

Mary

Hannay

 

Grennan.

 

Hugh

Hannay

 

Grennan.

 

Andrew

Hannay

 

Grennan.

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Kirktome.

Inch.

Alexander

Hannay

 

Lochans.

 

Robert

Hannay

s

Lochans.

 

Jean

Hannay

d

Lochans.

 

Robert

Hannay

 

Lochans.

 

Marion

McDowell

spous

Lochans.

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Spous to John Gordan, Garthcarie.

 

Elizabeth

Hannay

 

Beoch.

Kirkholm.

Nil.

 

 

 

Kirkowan.

Maria

Hannah

 

Over Mondork.

 

William

Hannah

 

Craigdow.

 

Robert

Hannay

 

Myle of Clugston.

 

Barbara

McNily

 

Myle of Clugston.

 

William

Hannay

 

Myle of Clugston.

 

Hew

Hannay

 

Myle of Clugston

 

Andrew

Hannay

 

Barnegist

 

John

Hannay

 

Barnegist

 

Andrew

Hannay

 

Meikle Killhocodale

 

Janet

Hannay

 

The Fill of Lochrule

 

John

Hannay

 

Craiglaw

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Craiglaw

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Drumboig

 

John

Hannay

 

Drumboig

Kirkinner

John

Hannay

 

Dereagill

 

Marion

Hannay

 

Baillaird

 

Isobel

Hanna

 

Airlies

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

Kirkwachop

 

John

Hannay

 

Kirkwachop

 

William

Hannay

 

Barnbarroch

 

Hugh

Hannay

 

Clutog

 

James

Hannay

 

Clutog

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Clutog

 

Jennet

Hannay

 

Clutog

 

Mary

Hannay

 

Capinoch

 

William

Hannay

 

Drumjargen

 

John

Hannay

 

Drumjargen

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Sleyhubbard

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Barnesse

 

Jennet

Hannay

 

Barnesse

 

John

Hannay

 

Barnesse

 

William

Hannay

 

Barnesse

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Barnesse

 

William

Hannay

 

Barnesse

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Bellgairne

 

William

Hannay

 

Blairshinnoch

 

Grissel

Hannay

 

Blairshinnoch

 

Ellen

Hannay

 

Blairshinnoch

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Blairshinnoch

 

Patrick

Hannay

 

Boreland

 

Jennet

Hannay

 

Boreland

 

Hugh

Hannay

 

Mill of Little Arresse

Kirkmaiden

Patrick

Hannay

 

Cardryn

 

Margaret

McMoreland

 

Cardryn

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Cardryn

 

George

Hannay

 

Cardryn

Leswalt

Nil

 

 

 

Minigaff

Nil

 

 

 

Mochrum

John

Hannay

 

Lands belonging to Sir William Maxwell

 

Michael

Hannay

 

Lands belonging to Sir William Maxwell

 

Mary

Hannay

 

Lands belonging to Sir William Maxwell

 

Jean

Hannay

 

Chany.

 

Mary

Hannay

 

Altocry.

 

John

Hannay

 

Dirrie

 

John

Hannay

 

Barcarham

 

Grissel

Hannay

 

Drumscoeg [Drumskeog?]

Penninghame

Patrick

Hannay

 

Balterson

 

Margaret

McGowne

 

Balterson

 

John

Hannay

s.

Balterson

 

Grissel

Hannay

d.

Balterson

 

Patrick

Hannay

s.

Balterson

 

John

Hannay

 

Barvennan

 

Mary

Hannay

widow

Barvennan

 

James

Hannay

h. cot

Overglasnich

Portpatrick

Jennet

Hannay

 

 

 

Thomas

Hannay

 

Craigbuie

 

Patrick

Hannay

 

Craigbuie

 

Jennet

Hannay

 

Craigbuie

 

Elizabeth

Hannay

 

Craigbuie

 

Mary

Hannay

 

Killantringen

Sorbie

Margaret

Hannay

 

Palmallet

 

Jennet

Hannay

 

Palmallet

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Palmallet

 

John

Hannay

 

Baltier

 

Andrew

Hannay

 

Baltier

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

Baltier

 

Elizabeth

Hannay

 

Kevens

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

Kirklands

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Cruggleton

 

Hew

Hannay

 

Cruggleton

 

John

Hannay

 

Cruggleton

 

Jannet

Hannay

 

Cults

 

Hugo

Hannay

 

Cults

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Cults

 

Jannet

Hannay

 

Cults

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Cults

 

Elizabeth

Hannay

 

Cults

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

Powton

 

John

Hannay

 

Powton

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Powton

 

Jannet

Hannay

 

Powton

 

John

Hannay

 

Powton

 

Jean

Hannay

 

Powton

 

William

Hannay

 

Powton

 

John

Hannay

 

Powton

 

John

Hannay

 

Powton

 

William

Hannay

 

Eggerness

 

Mary

Hannay

 

Eggerness

 

Jannet

Hannay

 

Cauldirrie

 

Thomas

Hannay

 

Cauldirrie

 

Archibald

Hannay

 

Cauldirrie

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

Cauldirrie

 

Patrick

Hannay

 

Cauldirrie

 

Thomas

Hannay

 

Penkhill

 

Janet

Shaw

 

Penkhill

 

James

Hannay

 

Penkhill

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Penkhill

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Yelton

 

Katherine

Hannay

 

Yelton

 

John

Hannay

 

Yelton

 

William

Hannay

 

Yelton

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Yelton

 

William

Hannay

 

Orchardtoune

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Orchardtoune

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

Orchardtoune

 

John

Hannay

 

Corwar

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Corwar

 

John

Hannay

 

Corwar

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Corwar

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Ingleston

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Ingleston

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Ingleston

 

Effie

Hannay

 

Ingleston

 

Grissel

Hannay

 

Ingleston

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Ingleston

 

George

Hannay

 

Ingleston

 

Jennet

Hannay

 

Ingleston

 

Elizabeth

Hannay

 

Myle of Whitehills

 

James

Hannay

 

Balseir

 

Marion

Hannay

 

Whythills

 

George

Hannay

 

Whythills

 

William

Hannay

 

Kilsture

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Kilsture

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Clonch

 

John

Hannay

 

Clonch

 

Jean

Hannay

 

Barmullin

 

Archibald

Hannay

 

Culnoye

 

Nicold.

Hannay

 

Culnoye

 

Hendrie

Hannay

 

Culkae

 

John

Hannay

 

Culkae

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Culkae

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Culkae

 

Elizabeth

Hannay

 

Doeltoune

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

Doeltoune

 

John

Hannay

 

Doeltoune

Stonykirk

Mary

Hannay

 

Culgroat

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Three Merk

 

Gilbert

Hannay

 

Laigh

 

John

Hannay

 

Laigh

 

David

Hannay

 

Balgregan

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Balgregan

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Kirkmabreck

 

Katherine

Hannay

 

Float

Stranraer

Nil

 

 

 

Whitehorn Burgh

Alexander

Hannay

 

 

 

Janet

Black

wife

 

 

Michael

Hannay

son

 

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

 

 

Ninian

Hannay

 

 

 

Elizabeth

Broadfoote

wife

 

 

John

Hannay

 

 

 

Marion

Agnew

 

 

 

John

Hannay

 

 

 

Bessie

Hannay

 

 

 

Grissel

Hannay

 

 

 

John

Hannay

 

 

 

Janet

Hannay

dau.

 

 

Elizabeth

Hannay

 

 

 

William

Hannay

 

 

 

James

Hannay

 

 

 

Janet

Hannay

 

 

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

 

 

Janet

Hannay

 

 

Whitehorn Parish

Andrew

Hannay

 

Portyerrocho

 

Andrew

Hannay

elder

Portyerrocho

 

Jane

Hannay

dau.

Portyerrocho

 

Isobel

Hannay

 

Portyerrocho

 

Christian

Hannay

 

Portyerrocho

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Portyerrocho

 

Helen

Hannay

 

Broughtonne wall

 

George

Hannay

 

Broughtonne wall

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Broughtonne wall

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Broughton Skeoch

 

Grissel

Hannay

 

Broughton Skeoch

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Oustoune Gallows

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

Castell wig.

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Broad Wig.

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

Ollrach

 

Elizabeth

Hannay

 

Buyoch

 

Ninian

Hannay

 

Balsmiths

 

Robert

Hannay

 

Owtoun Corwar

Wigtoune

Jean

Hannay

 

 

 

Janet

Hannay

 

 

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

 

 

Archibald

Hannay

 

 

 

John

Hannay

 

 

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

 

 

Issobell

Hannay

 

 

 

Andrew

Hannay

 

 

 

Robert

Hannay

 

 

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

Owtoun Corwar

 

Jean

Hanna

 

Clauchrie

 

Marie

Hanna

 

Clauchrie

 

Thomas

Hannay

 

Broardfield

 

Jo

Hanna

 

Torhouse

 

Elspeth

Hanna

adultress

 

 

Jan

Hannay

 

Balmay

 

Jo

Hanna

 

The Wood

 

Isobell

Hanna

 

Glenturke

 

Those who are fled irregular are Jennet Camphell and Thomas McKie residing in this parish are irregular Elizabeth Stewart excommunicate and Robert Shaw adulterer and Elspeth Hannay adulteress both contuminous as witness my hand,

William Watson, Minister of Wigtoun

 

D-Day, Garlieston and the Mulberry Harbours

Recently, Paul Hannah posted on Facebook that he was retracing the steps of his grandfather Roger, who participated in the D-Day invasion.

This reminded me of a surprising experience my family and I had in the summer of 2017.  We spent a few days with friends in Normandy, visiting Arromanches and other sites of the deployment of the allied forces’ Mulberry Harbours — portable landing piers and roadways that enabled transport ships to unload troops and equipment.  Because of the tidal characteristics and shallow slope of the Normandy beaches, large vessels were incapable of coming close to shore.  The Mulberry Harbours were a solution that enabled the ships to “dock” farther out at sea while long floating causeways moved up and down with the tides and connected the “docks” with the shore.

The remains of a portion of Mulberry Harbour – Normandy, 2017

After Normandy, we flew to Scotland to join some other friends up in Dumfries and Galloway, visiting, of course, Sorbie Tower and also stopping by for the requisite pint at the Harbour Inn in Garlieston, a mere mile to the East.  I had likely seen the memorial before, but I had never realized its significance.  Having just seen the real thing only two weeks before in France, I was pleasantly surprised at the synchronicity of coming across the locale of its prototype so close to Hannay territory!

“1945-1995: For the 50th Anniversary of the end of World War II this commemorates the building and trials of Sections of the MULBERRY HARBOUR 1941/4 at GARLIESTON, thus making the INVASION of EUROPE possible and an ALLIED VICTORY a reality”

To find out more about the history of the Mulberry Harbour trials in Garlieston, visit mulberryharbor.info

Origins of the Society

Much of the credit for  founding  the Clan Hannay Society goes to Pat Hanna, film star and impresario of Melbourne, Australia. It was his enthusiasm and his untiring efforts which brought consciousness to the clan.

In October of 1959 Pat Hanna met another enthusiast in London, John Hannay, Deputy Mayor of Chelsea. From this meeting the society was born. Pat Hanna then contacted Alex. Hannah, FCII of Inverness, and Donald C. Hannah, FRICS of Edinburgh where exploratory meetings were held in the latter’s home on March 8, 1960 and also at the home of Mrs. Bell at Sorbie on June 28, 1960. As a consequence of these meetings it was decided to form the society. A world-wide council was formed with John Hannay as Convener, Alex. Hannah as Secretary and Donald Hannah as Treasurer.

The first general meeting of the society was held on May 18, 1962 at the Commonwealth Club, London. On September 8, 1962 the society took part in a garden party organized by the Council of Scottish Clan Societies at Lauriston Castle, Edinburgh. There a number of interesting clan heirlooms were displayed in the clan tent and about a dozen members of the clan attended.

Each year since then a gathering of our clan has been held at Sorbie Tower, with council meetings at first in Edinburgh and more recently in Lockerbie. There have twice been meetings in Northern Irleand, where there are many with the name Hanna.

 

Origin of the Tartan

Posted by franklaw on January 6, 2012

There are many Hannay tartans out there, some radically different from others, but the generally accepted tartan today, i.e. the one that the Clan Hannay Society uses in all its material, and which is worn by visitors to the annual gathering, was officially registered with the Lord Lyon in 1984.

Although it is referred to as the “modern” Clan Hannay tartan, it is itself derived from an 18th century variant discovered by a Society councilmember among the effects of an ancestor. More details can be found at the Scottish Register of Tartans.

Many thanks to Martha Hanner for posting this information on the wall of the Clan Hannay Facebook Group!