The Will of William Hannay of Grennan

The following material was an appendix in editions 1-3 of The Hannays of Sorbie. In the process of editing the new 4th Edition (release date to be announced), this section was removed from the upcoming book. As we still wish to maintain the source material for research purposes, however, we are posting it here.

The will of William Hannay of Grennan (died 1573; see Chapter XII: The Hannays of Grennan) as transcribed by Stewart Francis in earlier editions:

“The Testament dative and inventar of the guides geir soumes of money and fettis pertaining to unquihile Williame Hannay in Gren[FL1] nane within the Parochin of Glenluce in Galloway the tyme of his decies quha decsit in the moneth of July the year of God jm V c Lxxiij yearis. fatthfullie maid and given up by himself as concerning the nomination dettis awin to him and dettis awand be him and partlie maid and given up be Marion McBryde his relict Hew Marjorie and Katherine Hannay is his lauchfull barne ownlie now on lyf as concerning the inventar of his guides and gier quhome he nominat his executoris in his lattir will underwritten of the date the secondday of July the yeir of god foirsaid befoir thir witness is Alexander McBryd in Ballmurry Andro Hannay Patrik Hannay Gilbert Hannay in Drygowis Andro Hannay his sone and Dene John Sanderis vivcar of Glenluce with untheris divers.

In primis the said umquhile Williame Hannay had the guides geir soumes of money and dettis of the avale and prices eftir following pertening to him the tyme of his deceis foirsaid viz. tuentie nyny ky price of the pece ourhied Vii summa j c xlv Li

·        Item viij quoyis of thrie yeir auldis price of the pece iij li. summa xxiiij li.

·        Item viij quoy beistis of tua yeir auldis price of the pece ourhied xl s summa xvj li.

·        Item ten stirkis of ane yeir auldis price of the pece xx s. summa x li.

·        Item xiij auld oxin price of the pece ourhied vj li summa xxviij li.

·        Item with Gilbert Hannay in Dygowis tua oxin price of the pece vj li summa xij li.

·        Item foure stottis of thrie yeir auldis price of the pece xi s summa viij li. Item ellevin scoir of auld schepe price of the pece ourhied xvjs. summa j c Lxxxj li .

·        Item Lx lambes price of the pece vj s. viij d. summa xx li.

·        Item fyve hon, price of the pece ourheid x merkis summa L merkis.

·        Item viij meris price of the pece v li summa xi li.

·        Item tua staigis of tua yeir auldis price of the pece Ls. summa v li.

·        Item thrie staigia of ane yeir auldis price of the pece xxxiij s. iiij d. summa v li

·        Item sawin on the grund ane boll bier estimat to the ferd corne extending to iiij bollis beir price of the boll with the fodder iiij merkis summa xvj markis.

·        Item xlv bollis aitt is sew in estimat to the third corne ex tending to vj xv bollis aittis price of the boll with the fodder ijJ merkis summa i c lxxx li.

·        Item in utencilis and domicilis with the abulzementis of his body estimat to sextene poundis. summa of the inventa vij c Lxxxxj li

Followis the debts awand to the deid

·        Item ther was awand to the said umquhile William Hannay be Gildert McCoull in Barlokkart tua hundreth merkis

·        Item awand be Alexander MaKilroy in Glenchymmar thrie schepe of fyve yeir auldis price of the pece xvj s summa xlviij s. Item be John McBryd fyve merkis Item awand be Marion Kennedy in areiss vj li x s wherof the defunct ordainis thrie pund to be given to John Hannay in Lochranald to releeve him of caution swa restis awand to him be hir de clara iij li x s.

·        Item awand be Alexander McKie in Martoun for the price of ane broun hors xvi j li Item awand be Gilbert Hannay bruther to the defunct fortie griet groittis in lent money price of the pece xviij d summa iij li. summa of the dettis awand to the deid j c.Lxi j li. xjj s. iiij d. summa of the inventar with the dettis ix c. Liij li xj s. ii i j d.

Followis the dettis awand be the deid

·        Item ther was. awand be the said umquhile William Hannay to the laird of Barnebarrocht for coft aittis xxvj merkis

·        Item mair to the said laird of the rest of ane greter soum xx merkis

·        Item to Andro McCulvie for come xx li Item to Sir Harbert Andersoun vj li. vj s. viij d.

·        Item to Alexander McBryd in Balmurry iij li Item to William Carstane in Cluquhane for thrie yeiris nultar bipast vj hollis aittis price of the boll ourheid xxx s. summa ix li.

·        Item to Archibald Kennedy iii li for the Whitsunday male Item to the abbay of Glenluce for six hollis teind meill of Grenane of the crop in anno 1572 yeiris xi j li.

·        Item to the said abbay for tua hollis teind meill of Glenchymmer of the same crop iiij li. Item to James Hannay xxxv li.

·        Item to John Hannay his bruthir x merkis Item to Gilbert Stevin in Custreauch iijj li xs. for tua hollis aittis coft Item to Michaell Makilroy in Arebig xxxv s for ane boll of corne Item to my lord of Cassilis of stent silver upon the Cheinis vj li

·        Item to Margaret Storie Johne McCulvie wyf vj li. Item to for mawing of the medow xxxv s ltetm to John McCairdy for his fie xxiij s. iiij d.

·        Item to Marion Aschellane and Malie McMurries xiij s. i iij d.

·        Item to Gilbert Aschellane bird of fie vj s viij d. Item to Fergus McKie restand of ane ox price xxxvjs viij d.

·        Item to Archibald Kennedy for mertymes male of Grenene in anno 1573 viij li

·        Item to the place of Glenluce for teind me ill in anno aforesaid vj hollis tiend meill price theof xi j li.

·        Item to Niniane Carsane myllar for multour tua hollis aittis price iiij merkis

As to the abbottis dettis awand be Johne McDonald in areis the said John at his lattir will commandit the laird of Gartland and Johns wyf to releve me of all thir dettis conforme to thir promeis Summa of the dettis awand be the deid j c lxxv li vj s viij d; Restis of frie geir and dettis deductit vij c lxxviij li iiij s viij d. to be devidit in thrie partis the deidis part is ij c lix li viij s ij d Quairy the quot is componit for viii ji li Followis the deidis legacie and lattir will, Upon the secund day of July the yeir of god j m cv lxxiij veris the quahilk day the said William Hannay in Grenane being seik in body and haill in mynd maid his lattir will and legacie as follows vic Imprimis I leve all my titill rychts and kyndness of all my takkis and stedingis to Hew Hannay my sone quha failzeing to my dochters successive thay being mfiriet upoun anne Hannay

·        Item to Gilbert Hannay my bruther ten pund or ane naig worth ten pund

·        Item to George Hannay ane bruon naig in his ane hand To Margaret Hannay fyve merkis in hir husbands hand To Jonet Hannay Fynlay Hannay dochter tua pectis mele yeirlil.! for six yeirs to cum to Williame Myllar in Lochrannell thrie pectis aittis for all biganes or thrie pundes money to the vicares tua wadderis

·        Item ordainis my wyf to hald Johne Hannay James Hannay brother with myn awne barnes quhill they cum to perfyt age and depe the ten merkis in the mene tyme and theirafter deliver him the said x merkis

To George McColme wyf and hir sister ane hors and ane ox in their awne handis And George McColme to tak his chois To Alexander Hannay of Sorbie my best gray hors for maintanance and defending of my barnes Sen nothing is mair certaine nor the deid and na thing mair uncertane nor the hour of deid quairfor I William Hannay seik in body Haill in my mind and spirit makis my testament and lattir will in maner following:

First randir and committis my saule to almychtie god my creatour to abyd with all the blissit cumpany in hevin and ordainis my body to be buriet in St Michaellis Kirk in Glenluce and ordainis constitutis and creattis my executour Marion McBryde my spous and all my barnes above written and intromittoris with all my guides and geir and ordainis Alexander Hannay of Sorbie overman and defender of my wyf and barnes and ordainis my wyf and barnes to remane togidder in all my roumes induring her widoheid and grif scho maries with advys of the said laird of Sorbie scho to remane in lykmanner in roumes with my barnes to thir perfyt age Failzeing therof the roumes to be left to the barnes and that they use the councill of the said overman.

This present testament wes maid in the said William duelling place in Grenane before me Sir Johne Sanderis vicar of Glenluce day year and moneth abovewritten befior thir witnesses Alexander McBryd in Balmurry Andro Hannay Patrick Hannay Gilbert Hannay in Dargowis and Andro Hannay his sone with divers others.

Sic subscribitur Ita est Dominus Joannes Sanderis Vallislucis vicarius ac minister manu propria.

We Messers Edward Henrysoun doctor in the vis Alexander Sym and Johne Prestoun advocattis commissaris of Edinburgh speciale constituit for confirming of testamentis be the tennour herof satisfies approvis and confirms this present testament in sa far as the samin is duelie and lachfullie maid of the guidis and geir above specificet alanerlie and gives and committis the intromission with the samin to the said Marion McBryd relict Hew Marjorie and Katherine Hannay is the only baimes now on lyf to the said umquhile William Hannay and executouris testamentaris to him Reservand compt to be maid be thame therof as accordis of the law and the said executoris being suoune haif maid fayth truelie to exerce the said office and haif fundin caution that the guides and geir abovewritten sal be furthcumand to al parteis havand interes as law will as ane act maid therupon beris.”

 


The Stewart Family and the Grennan Hannays

The following material was an appendix in editions 1-3 of The Hannays of Sorbie. In the process of editing the new 4th Edition (release date to be announced), this section was removed from the upcoming book. As we still wish to maintain the source material for research purposes, however, we are posting it here.

In the 16th Century, the Hannays of Grennan married into the family of
Alexander Stewart, the 3rd Laird of Garlies and Dalswinton

Parish Lists from 1684

The following material was an appendix in editions 1-3 of The Hannays of Sorbie. In the process of editing the new 4th Edition (release date to be announced), this section was removed from the upcoming book. As we still wish to maintain the source material for research purposes, however, we are posting it here.

            Appendix A: Parish Lists, 1684

To illustrate the variations in the spelling of the family name in Galloway in the 17th century, here follows an extract from parish records. It also gives an example of the effect of the religious enforcement laws upon the populace. Each parish minister was required to produce a list like the following.  It showed all persons over twelve years of age so the magistrates could administer the Test. These lists were required as of October 15, 1684.

 

Parish

First Name

Last Name

Notes

Glasserton.

Alexander

Hannay

 

Arbrick.

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Cottars.

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Cottars.

 

William

Hannay

 

Cottars.

 

Robert

Hannay

 

Cottars.

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

Cottars.

 

Michael

Hannay

 

Challochblewan.

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Challochblewan.

 

Elspeth

Hannay

 

Challochblewan.

 

Jean

Hannay

 

Glaston.

 

Christian

Hannay

 

Cottars.

Glenluce.

Alexander

Hannay

 

Gillespie.

 

Mary

Hannay

 

Cullfassen.

 

Mary

Hannay

wyf of John Torbran

Culfassen.

 

Patrick

Hannay

 

Gass.

 

William

Hannay

 

in Glenchalmer, Glenchalmer.

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Ball nell.

 

James

Hannay

 

Galldannoch.

 

John

Hannay

 

and his wyf, Grennan.

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Grennan.

 

William

Hannay

 

Grennan.

 

Mary

Hannay

 

Grennan.

 

Hugh

Hannay

 

Grennan.

 

Andrew

Hannay

 

Grennan.

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Kirktome.

Inch.

Alexander

Hannay

 

Lochans.

 

Robert

Hannay

s

Lochans.

 

Jean

Hannay

d

Lochans.

 

Robert

Hannay

 

Lochans.

 

Marion

McDowell

spous

Lochans.

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Spous to John Gordan, Garthcarie.

 

Elizabeth

Hannay

 

Beoch.

Kirkholm.

Nil.

 

 

 

Kirkowan.

Maria

Hannah

 

Over Mondork.

 

William

Hannah

 

Craigdow.

 

Robert

Hannay

 

Myle of Clugston.

 

Barbara

McNily

 

Myle of Clugston.

 

William

Hannay

 

Myle of Clugston.

 

Hew

Hannay

 

Myle of Clugston

 

Andrew

Hannay

 

Barnegist

 

John

Hannay

 

Barnegist

 

Andrew

Hannay

 

Meikle Killhocodale

 

Janet

Hannay

 

The Fill of Lochrule

 

John

Hannay

 

Craiglaw

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Craiglaw

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Drumboig

 

John

Hannay

 

Drumboig

Kirkinner

John

Hannay

 

Dereagill

 

Marion

Hannay

 

Baillaird

 

Isobel

Hanna

 

Airlies

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

Kirkwachop

 

John

Hannay

 

Kirkwachop

 

William

Hannay

 

Barnbarroch

 

Hugh

Hannay

 

Clutog

 

James

Hannay

 

Clutog

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Clutog

 

Jennet

Hannay

 

Clutog

 

Mary

Hannay

 

Capinoch

 

William

Hannay

 

Drumjargen

 

John

Hannay

 

Drumjargen

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Sleyhubbard

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Barnesse

 

Jennet

Hannay

 

Barnesse

 

John

Hannay

 

Barnesse

 

William

Hannay

 

Barnesse

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Barnesse

 

William

Hannay

 

Barnesse

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Bellgairne

 

William

Hannay

 

Blairshinnoch

 

Grissel

Hannay

 

Blairshinnoch

 

Ellen

Hannay

 

Blairshinnoch

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Blairshinnoch

 

Patrick

Hannay

 

Boreland

 

Jennet

Hannay

 

Boreland

 

Hugh

Hannay

 

Mill of Little Arresse

Kirkmaiden

Patrick

Hannay

 

Cardryn

 

Margaret

McMoreland

 

Cardryn

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Cardryn

 

George

Hannay

 

Cardryn

Leswalt

Nil

 

 

 

Minigaff

Nil

 

 

 

Mochrum

John

Hannay

 

Lands belonging to Sir William Maxwell

 

Michael

Hannay

 

Lands belonging to Sir William Maxwell

 

Mary

Hannay

 

Lands belonging to Sir William Maxwell

 

Jean

Hannay

 

Chany.

 

Mary

Hannay

 

Altocry.

 

John

Hannay

 

Dirrie

 

John

Hannay

 

Barcarham

 

Grissel

Hannay

 

Drumscoeg [Drumskeog?]

Penninghame

Patrick

Hannay

 

Balterson

 

Margaret

McGowne

 

Balterson

 

John

Hannay

s.

Balterson

 

Grissel

Hannay

d.

Balterson

 

Patrick

Hannay

s.

Balterson

 

John

Hannay

 

Barvennan

 

Mary

Hannay

widow

Barvennan

 

James

Hannay

h. cot

Overglasnich

Portpatrick

Jennet

Hannay

 

 

 

Thomas

Hannay

 

Craigbuie

 

Patrick

Hannay

 

Craigbuie

 

Jennet

Hannay

 

Craigbuie

 

Elizabeth

Hannay

 

Craigbuie

 

Mary

Hannay

 

Killantringen

Sorbie

Margaret

Hannay

 

Palmallet

 

Jennet

Hannay

 

Palmallet

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Palmallet

 

John

Hannay

 

Baltier

 

Andrew

Hannay

 

Baltier

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

Baltier

 

Elizabeth

Hannay

 

Kevens

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

Kirklands

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Cruggleton

 

Hew

Hannay

 

Cruggleton

 

John

Hannay

 

Cruggleton

 

Jannet

Hannay

 

Cults

 

Hugo

Hannay

 

Cults

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Cults

 

Jannet

Hannay

 

Cults

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Cults

 

Elizabeth

Hannay

 

Cults

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

Powton

 

John

Hannay

 

Powton

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Powton

 

Jannet

Hannay

 

Powton

 

John

Hannay

 

Powton

 

Jean

Hannay

 

Powton

 

William

Hannay

 

Powton

 

John

Hannay

 

Powton

 

John

Hannay

 

Powton

 

William

Hannay

 

Eggerness

 

Mary

Hannay

 

Eggerness

 

Jannet

Hannay

 

Cauldirrie

 

Thomas

Hannay

 

Cauldirrie

 

Archibald

Hannay

 

Cauldirrie

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

Cauldirrie

 

Patrick

Hannay

 

Cauldirrie

 

Thomas

Hannay

 

Penkhill

 

Janet

Shaw

 

Penkhill

 

James

Hannay

 

Penkhill

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Penkhill

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Yelton

 

Katherine

Hannay

 

Yelton

 

John

Hannay

 

Yelton

 

William

Hannay

 

Yelton

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Yelton

 

William

Hannay

 

Orchardtoune

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Orchardtoune

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

Orchardtoune

 

John

Hannay

 

Corwar

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Corwar

 

John

Hannay

 

Corwar

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Corwar

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Ingleston

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Ingleston

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Ingleston

 

Effie

Hannay

 

Ingleston

 

Grissel

Hannay

 

Ingleston

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Ingleston

 

George

Hannay

 

Ingleston

 

Jennet

Hannay

 

Ingleston

 

Elizabeth

Hannay

 

Myle of Whitehills

 

James

Hannay

 

Balseir

 

Marion

Hannay

 

Whythills

 

George

Hannay

 

Whythills

 

William

Hannay

 

Kilsture

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Kilsture

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Clonch

 

John

Hannay

 

Clonch

 

Jean

Hannay

 

Barmullin

 

Archibald

Hannay

 

Culnoye

 

Nicold.

Hannay

 

Culnoye

 

Hendrie

Hannay

 

Culkae

 

John

Hannay

 

Culkae

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Culkae

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Culkae

 

Elizabeth

Hannay

 

Doeltoune

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

Doeltoune

 

John

Hannay

 

Doeltoune

Stonykirk

Mary

Hannay

 

Culgroat

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Three Merk

 

Gilbert

Hannay

 

Laigh

 

John

Hannay

 

Laigh

 

David

Hannay

 

Balgregan

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Balgregan

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Kirkmabreck

 

Katherine

Hannay

 

Float

Stranraer

Nil

 

 

 

Whitehorn Burgh

Alexander

Hannay

 

 

 

Janet

Black

wife

 

 

Michael

Hannay

son

 

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

 

 

Ninian

Hannay

 

 

 

Elizabeth

Broadfoote

wife

 

 

John

Hannay

 

 

 

Marion

Agnew

 

 

 

John

Hannay

 

 

 

Bessie

Hannay

 

 

 

Grissel

Hannay

 

 

 

John

Hannay

 

 

 

Janet

Hannay

dau.

 

 

Elizabeth

Hannay

 

 

 

William

Hannay

 

 

 

James

Hannay

 

 

 

Janet

Hannay

 

 

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

 

 

Janet

Hannay

 

 

Whitehorn Parish

Andrew

Hannay

 

Portyerrocho

 

Andrew

Hannay

elder

Portyerrocho

 

Jane

Hannay

dau.

Portyerrocho

 

Isobel

Hannay

 

Portyerrocho

 

Christian

Hannay

 

Portyerrocho

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Portyerrocho

 

Helen

Hannay

 

Broughtonne wall

 

George

Hannay

 

Broughtonne wall

 

Alexander

Hannay

 

Broughtonne wall

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Broughton Skeoch

 

Grissel

Hannay

 

Broughton Skeoch

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

Oustoune Gallows

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

Castell wig.

 

Janet

Hannay

 

Broad Wig.

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

Ollrach

 

Elizabeth

Hannay

 

Buyoch

 

Ninian

Hannay

 

Balsmiths

 

Robert

Hannay

 

Owtoun Corwar

Wigtoune

Jean

Hannay

 

 

 

Janet

Hannay

 

 

 

Margaret

Hannay

 

 

 

Archibald

Hannay

 

 

 

John

Hannay

 

 

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

 

 

Issobell

Hannay

 

 

 

Andrew

Hannay

 

 

 

Robert

Hannay

 

 

 

Agnes

Hannay

 

Owtoun Corwar

 

Jean

Hanna

 

Clauchrie

 

Marie

Hanna

 

Clauchrie

 

Thomas

Hannay

 

Broardfield

 

Jo

Hanna

 

Torhouse

 

Elspeth

Hanna

adultress

 

 

Jan

Hannay

 

Balmay

 

Jo

Hanna

 

The Wood

 

Isobell

Hanna

 

Glenturke

 

Those who are fled irregular are Jennet Camphell and Thomas McKie residing in this parish are irregular Elizabeth Stewart excommunicate and Robert Shaw adulterer and Elspeth Hannay adulteress both contuminous as witness my hand,

William Watson, Minister of Wigtoun

 

George Washington Hanna

Pioneer and Town Father, 1817- 1890

George Washington Hanna was born in White County, Illinois, on November 20, 1817. He was the third son of George Hanna and Mary Melrose.

His most notable achievement was founding the city of Waterloo, Iowa.

George Hanna and his wife, Mary departed Illinois for Iowa in May of 1845.  Their transportation was two yoke of oxen and a wagon.  They also had a few head of cattle. On July 1, 1845, the party reached the east side of the Cedar river at a point which would later become the town of Waterloo.  When his young wife, Mary, saw the site selected she looked across the river to the bluffs sprinkled with oak and maple and made her prophetic statement to her two young sons, “This seems to be the river of life and over yonder is Canaan.  Let’s cross over.  Boys, if you live long enough, you will see a fine town grow up in these hills.”

Hanna plotted out land for his farm on one of hills where the city library stands today.  There were no settlers in the area for the next five years.  There were no roads, only uncleared trails.  At that time, they thought what would be Black Hawk county would only support one hundred people.  No one dreamed of Waterloo as it is today with a population of 67,934. 

In February 27, 1851, George Hanna was elected justice of the peace and performed the first marriage.  He donated his land to the city for the dam, mill and school house.  Much later his house and land were donated to build a library.

Mary Hanna, wife of George Hanna

George Hanna was one of the original settlers and founders of Waterloo.  He led other settlers Charles Mullan and John H Brooks to their new home in the west. In later years he lived in comparative retirement upon his farm above the city on the Cedar Falls road.  This was the perfect spot for the old pioneer to watch the city grow.

Hon. James R. Hanna, Educator Politician and Entrepreneur

Born in Genesco, Illinois on June 12, 1866, James Hanna was the son of James Steele Hanna and the brother of Frank Willard Hanna.  At nine years old his mother died and the family moved west to the cattle country of Western Nebraska.  At thirteen James R Hanna began earning his own living.  He was employed as a farm labor in Jackson township and worked in construction of the trans continental railroad in western Iowa.  At eighteen he secured a teaching certificate and taught for 4 years in clay and Jackson townships.

In 1890 James entered Highland Park College where he earned a B.A degree in 1892. He did special work in Harvard College in 1893 and received  a master of arts degree in 1899. He also taught Greek and Latin for a number of years. In 1905 he was made head of his of English department at Highland Park College and Dean of the liberal arts college.

In 1910 he entered the mayor’s race as a reform candidate and was elected for three consecutive terms for his honesty and integrity.  He built a new city hall, wrote a building code for the city and revised the structure of government to the commission form of government.  When he ran the first time he felt the city government was corrupt and took his cause to the people preaching honesty and fairness. The current mayor speaks of him often and considers him a role model. He also chaired the first city plan campaign.

After his run as major he became President of the Iowa Bank and was responsible for a lot of small business starting in Iowa.  His farm is where the current Adventureland is today in Altoona. He built an air strip where he used to fly dignitaries into Des Moines. Mr. Hanna distinguished himself for his stand against dishonesty and political affairs. The Honorable James R. Hanna died in 1931.

D-Day, Garlieston and the Mulberry Harbours

Recently, Paul Hannah posted on Facebook that he was retracing the steps of his grandfather Roger, who participated in the D-Day invasion.

This reminded me of a surprising experience my family and I had in the summer of 2017.  We spent a few days with friends in Normandy, visiting Arromanches and other sites of the deployment of the allied forces’ Mulberry Harbours — portable landing piers and roadways that enabled transport ships to unload troops and equipment.  Because of the tidal characteristics and shallow slope of the Normandy beaches, large vessels were incapable of coming close to shore.  The Mulberry Harbours were a solution that enabled the ships to “dock” farther out at sea while long floating causeways moved up and down with the tides and connected the “docks” with the shore.

The remains of a portion of Mulberry Harbour – Normandy, 2017

After Normandy, we flew to Scotland to join some other friends up in Dumfries and Galloway, visiting, of course, Sorbie Tower and also stopping by for the requisite pint at the Harbour Inn in Garlieston, a mere mile to the East.  I had likely seen the memorial before, but I had never realized its significance.  Having just seen the real thing only two weeks before in France, I was pleasantly surprised at the synchronicity of coming across the locale of its prototype so close to Hannay territory!

“1945-1995: For the 50th Anniversary of the end of World War II this commemorates the building and trials of Sections of the MULBERRY HARBOUR 1941/4 at GARLIESTON, thus making the INVASION of EUROPE possible and an ALLIED VICTORY a reality”

To find out more about the history of the Mulberry Harbour trials in Garlieston, visit mulberryharbor.info

Happy St. Patrick’s Day 2018

Greetings Hanna/y/h/ey cousins, with a Happy St. Patrick’s Day to those of us who trace our ultimate Sorbie lineage back through an Irish branch.  Interested in finding out more about your Scots-Irish connections?  Here are some resources to get you started…

The Hannahs of Hannahfield

Miss Margaret Hudson originally produced this Historical Paper in 1974

It sounds like the title of an old Anna Neagle film or a novel by Thomas Armstrong. In fact, there was really only one Hannah of Hannahfield, and this paper is as much an attempt to show the fascination of tracing family history, as it is a story of the Hannahs of Dumfries. This, I hope, will encourage others to try to find out more about their own branch of the Clan. As you will know, in recent years there has been an increasing interest in genealogy and family history. My own interest only dates back a few years, when retirement allowed me time to take up research. I heard of our Clan Society from a Hannah cousin and he lent me a copy of the family tree, which had been prepared m support of a petition to the crown in 1870 by our great grandfather for the return of the property in Dumfries called Hannahfield.

Hannahfield Hall near Dumfries (Click to zoom)

I already knew of this and had spent a short holiday in SW Scotland, when I discovered the family grave in St Michael’s Dumfries and tried to locate Hannahfield in the area of the Kingholm. The first Hannah on the family tree was John, born in the 17th century. He had two sons, one of whom was baptised at Penningham in 1696. This is the first place mentioned and thereafter only places of burial are noted. These two sons each had among other children, a son and he two cousins Alexander and Robert who married sisters Rachel and Agnes Blount. Of the two families, Alexander’s at one time went to Huddersfield and Robert’s to Dumfries.

Robert and Agnes had a son, John born in 1761 who became owner of the Hannahfield estate [also known as Ladyfield West]. He died unmarried and it is his brother Alexander who is my ancestor. John was born at a time when economic conditions in Scotland were improving and the country was enjoying peace for the first time in centuries. Agriculture, industry and transport systems were developing. Literature, art and architecture were flourishing and many Scots made fortunes in the colonies. John was one such and owned an estate in Jamaica called Hannah’s Town. According to the book ‘Memories of St Michael’s’ he amassed a fortune in the West Indies. It has been suggested that he might be the originator of the Antigua farthing token coin in 1836 – attributed to Hannah & Coltart – but Antigua is a long way from Jamaica and there is nothing to suggest any links.

My great grandfather, another John, did succeed to the Jamaican property, but according to the petition, had to wait seven years before he received any rents. I do not know how long he enjoyed these rents, but through business reverses he lost the property, which (I quote) “was a further disappointment to the petitioner.” These reverses may have been in the woollen trade in Huddersfield or in Jamaica itself. In 1846, five years after my great grandfather inherited the Jamaican property, the Sugar Equalisation Act was passed in Britain as part of the Free Trade Policy, which eventually abolished all protective duties, which favoured the colonies. Rum, coffee and other exports were involved and in 1847 a commercial crisis in Britain also contributed to the ruin of the plantations. I do not know what type of plantation Hannah’s Town was; research continues.

We know more about the Dumfries property and its loss to the family. Part of it called Kingholm, was bought from the burgh in about 1827, at a time when the Council was in financial difficulties. Another part of the property had the attractive name of ‘Cherry Trees’ but its doubtless proud owner changed the name of the whole estate to Hannahfield. He apparently always said that he intended a Hannah to live there after his death and his only relative of that name was his cousin (a few times removed) – my great great grandfather. He did however, have a nephew, his sister’s son Thomas Wood, and it was he who inherited under Scottish Law when John died at the age of 80 without leaving a will. Thomas Wood had no children and at the death of his widow in 1868 the property passed to the Crown. Kingholm was the place where the traditional competition by the Trades for the ‘Silver’ Gun given by James VI was held and the burgh was anxious to regain this historic site. They petitioned Queen Victoria to re-grant them the land and this was in 1873. The Hannahfield monument in St Michael’s Churchyard described in the Memorials as a stately modern (i.e. in the 1870’s) monument in the Grecian style’, commemorates all these people, including John’s parents, Robert Hannah and Agnes Blount.

It is interesting to see that Thomas Wood’s brother James was buried at Kingston, Jamaica at the age of 19, and one surmises that he was there on his uncle’s business. Some of the Blount family, cousins of the Hannahs also died in Jamaica, according to the other monuments.

Now I turn to the Hannahs of Huddersfield. The first Hannah who appears to have lived in Huddersfield was another John, who also died unmarried. He was a son of Alexander Hannah and Rachel Blount and was born in 1758. We know nothing of why he went to Yorkshire but it would seem that he was joined by his nephew, yet another John, (the same John who was promised the Hannahfield property). The latter’s father, Alexander, was buried at Manchester and some of his family at Blackburn, so perhaps the two brothers both entered the textile trade – one in wool and the other in cotton. 11 A trade directory for 1845, when he was 48, shows John Hannah & Company, Woollen Cloth Manufacturers and Merchants, and the petition referred to him as head of one of the “oldest established firms in Huddersfield.” I have an album, which belonged to his wife Margaret, showing their address as Bay Hall,  Huddersfield. I imagined this to be a mill owner’s mansion and when I saw the name mentioned in a book about Huddersfield I wrote to the author to make enquiries, as I intended to visit the town. He replied that four or five families now live in the original house but it may have given its name to the surrounding district. In fact, when I did visit there I found it difficult to picture it as a complete house, as it appeared to be a conglomeration of odd buildings and a far cry from what I had imagined.

There used to be a painting of this mid-Victorian couple in my grandmother’s home in London – a forbidding – looking pair, especially John – or so they seemed to me as a child. These, together with a much more interesting picture of an earlier Hannah – a man with red hair and holding a document bearing a seal – had to be abandoned when I inherited them. It was wartime and we had other things on our minds. They would never have fitted into a modem flat anyway. My Hannah grandfather died long before I was born, so that I was never able to ask him – even had I been interested then – who the man was. I also own a silhouette, which could be of the same man. On the back is written Mr Hanay (one n and a y) but no trade label showing the artist. This started my interest in silhouettes and, from seeing others in an identical style, I am almost certain this was by William Bullock of Liverpool. To be more accurate, the artist William Alport, who rented a studio in Bullock’s Museum there. The subject could be one of the three Hannahs – all born around 1760 – if it was John Hannah of Hannahfield could he have been in Liverpool en-route from/to Jamaica? My guess is that it is of Alexander Hannah who lived either in Blackburn or Manchester.

Among other relics, there is a fob seal with the Hannay coat of arms and a set of coachman’s buttons bearing the crest. I believe these belonged to Alexander Hannah, born 1823, and that it was his wife who had them made. It was the thing in Victorian days to be able to produce a family coat of arms, but of course these Hannahs were not armigerous. In Margaret Hannah’s album there are some examples of fine penmanship of the 1830’s. I had owned it for a long time before I noticed the signature – J Craik on one page. This name seemed familiar and on rereading a book on Dumfries dated 1832, which belonged to her son Alexander, I found that a Mr Craik taught penmanship at the Academy. Perhaps this means that the Huddersfield Hannahs visited Dumfries. There are many place names in the album, which Margaret Hannah must have taken on her travels, such as Kendal, Matlock and Lytham, but not Dumfries. Such are the small clues, which tantalize us. Margaret Hannah must have been musical, or perhaps it was politeness, which made one contributor to the album write a typical Victorian poem “To Mrs Hannah,” containing the verse “Then raise the voice thou favour’d one And others please as thou pleas’d me Thy varied song when thou art gone Will still be sweet to my memory.”

I turn to the album again for sad news – the last entry is by Robert Bell, (perhaps the Reverend Bell) and dated 1868. It says “Succour and hope – words affectionately offered to Mr & Mrs John Hannah and their only son in their season of deep and long continued trial” and then follows some verses. As John died in 1869 it may refer to his illness. When I visited Huddersfield I was able to see a notebook kept by Isaac Hordem, cashier of the Ramsden Estate in the 19th century. A brief entry in 1877 said, “Hannah’s property purchased.” You will remember I mentioned the Blount family and part of their family tree was included in the Hannahfield petition to show that the petitioner was a cousin to John of Hannahfield on both male and female sides. Some place names on this intrigued me – particularly “Stay the Voyage.” Through our Clan Society I had obtained a copy of the Galloway family Place Names from its author Dr Russell, so I wrote to him asking if he knew of this place name. He did not, but wrote to the Dumfries Standard with my query. This produced someone who went to the paper’s offices with a Blount family tree about 3 to 4 feet square, which mentioned the places I had asked about – all except “Stay the Voyage.” As it gave his address I wrote to him and in our subsequent correspondence he had produced some interesting old papers belonging to the Blount family dating back to 1705. What interested me is that the family tree was also inscribed “Hannahfield Succession referred to in a petition to the Lords Commissioners of Her Majesty’s Treasury in 1870.” Not only that, but the house in which he lives in Dumfries is called Hannahville and was built by John Hannah in, it is believed 1880. Here is yet another John Hannah who does not belong to my branch. Perhaps one of our members can claim him? I should be interested to know.

Courtesy of David Hannah

A Hannay recollection of Drummaston, Whithorn from 1896

Eighty Years Ago, “and on”

by Mrs Marjorie Hannay Meredith, Cones Cottage, 88 Old Woking Road, West Byfleet, Weybridge, Surrey – circa 1975

This is a little tribute to Galloway, my Grandmother’s home county – her Drumaston [Drummaston] home at Whithorn. I was born in Dover in February 1896 – a very unpromising baby! Even my loving Grandmother, (born Mary Hannay of Drumaston), who came from Newcastle-on-Tyne, to see her first grandchild, had grave doubts as to whether I should survive and tried to console my mother – “I don’t think you’ll rear this one, dear”, and the general opinion was that I resembled a tenpenny rabbit. Not to be defeated by any premature baby, as soon as she was able to travel, my mother (Mary Hannay-Thompson) took me off to the Old Home at Drumaston, and there the miracle happened.

The fine balmy air, “the good cow’s milk” and rest for my mother, did it aided by the constant care of two devoted Great-Aunts. “Aunt Miller” and “Aunt Minnoch” took over, and for two months we were nursed and cared for. My father, (John Hannay Thompson) wrote in his diary in May 1896. “Lell and Baby returned today, both looking so well and bonnie; I can hardly believe it”. In later years, we spent a summer holiday at Drumaston every second year, till I was twelve, and I remember much of those visits.

The house was a whitewashed typical Galloway farmhouse. It was T-shaped, with the traditional plain front, and in ‘tail’ were the children’s play room and stable. The three upstairs bedrooms facing the front had dormer windows, the first in the district. (People were afraid of windows being blown-in by storms, and they used to come to see “the upstairs room” and then went home and tried them out too!). (The house looks much the same now, with the addition of a handsome porch. The tail of the T is now a ‘milking parlour’ for Ayrshire Creameries). The garden is, as I remember it (but it felt bigger in those days!) and the big apple tree had to be cut down. It had got very old and infirm, but long ago the apples must have been very potent. I remember some boys coming to spend the day, and they gradually disappeared. I asked Aunt Minnoch where they were and she said “upstairs in the big spare room bed with sore tummies – too many green apples!” The paths in the garden are still bordered with yellow “butter and eggs” plants in the spring. Here my parents did their ‘courting’. The kitchen was the largest room in the house and a very busy place as there were many to cook for. In those days the farmhands had a midday meal in the kitchen, (the practice is now discontinued as wages are higher). The food was plentiful and simple – though I think I was especially favoured in the dining room with pink ‘Blanc Mange’ of which I had six helpings. This happened on my last, at twelve years old visit. “The Aunts” of course did all their own stillroom work, jam and bottling etc. They put pears down in brandy wine – we won’t ask how they got it! “Watch the wall my darling, as the gentlemen ride by!”

But it wasn’t all work! Neighbouring friends always came to see us, and be paid return visits – which were always for the whole day. We set out in the morning in the Victoria, arriving in time for home made wine for the ladies, and seed cake for me (which later I always detested), but there always seemed to be heaps of strawberries everywhere. I know nothing of the cold windy winters and to me it was always a land literally flowing with milk and honey, and the breezes were always balmy. There was a wagonette in which ‘The Uncles’ and other grown-ups went to dances, especially soon after the harvest (my mother could remember going to dances at Castlemilk (Wigg). The Dinnans shore near St Ninian’s Cave was rather far off, but ‘the horse’ took us and I can remember my mother and grandmother (and me) paddling together on the sandy beach. A fishing boat had come in, and a fisherwoman sold us mackerel, literally out of the sea. They had hardly been in her creel! She must have been glad to see us, as I never saw a soul in sight (where now in summer there is a Tourist invasion). The Doctor and the Minister were great friends and allies.

We went to ‘Worship’ in the Presbyterian Church. This is “Covenanters Country”. The Laird at Kirkdale would vote and worship with the Establishment, but the younger sons went their own ways and staunchly upheld the Kirk! My Grandmother and “The Aunts” were all expert needlewomen and I wonder now, how they saw to make the lovely things they did by lamplight. Everyone seemed to be able to play the upright piano, and I well remember my Grandmother playing and singing “The Bluebells of Scotland”. You could almost hear them tinkle! They did not sit up late and short ‘Worship’ closed the day. This was Whithorn as I knew it and when I visited it last year found little changed. The family (Lindsays) who bought Drumaston when the “Old Aunts” died (both nearing 100 years old) are still there, and Mr Lindsay is still farming and Mrs Lindsay sews! Their sons like the Hannays of previous generations went to Glasgow University, and the eldest son came back as a farmer. In the Aunts hey-day the boys had to go to Carlisle on ponies, and there join the train for Glasgow. They both took a bag of meal! The pattern of life is basically the same, but fewer young people remain. There are other worlds for them to conquer, as there always were – but Galloway is still there to revisit, and to keep memory green.

Excerpted from a 2003 Historical Paper by the Clan Hannay Society, with thanks to Mrs Marjorie Hannay Meredith and Clan Constable David Hannah

Darryl Hannah

This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Darryl Hannah was born December 3rd 1960 in Chicago, Illinois, USA, daughter of Donald Christian Hannah (1933) and Susan Metzger.

As an actor Darryl has starred in several movies, including Blade Runner (1982), Mermaid (1984), Kill Bill (2004) and the Netflix Series Sense8 (2016).

Darryl’s great, great grandfather, John Hannah, was born in Scotland 1837. His son James Hannah (1865) was also born in Scotland.

Both John and James emigrated to the USA between 1865 and 1890, ultimately settling in Chicago, Illinois, USA, where he had a son James A Hannah (1893-1985).

Darryl’s grandfather James A Hannah founded the tug and barge firm Hannah Marine in Lemont Illinois, USA.

Is John Hannah (1837) related to the Sorbie Hannays ?

Sources